Home > Literature, Social Commentary > “Correcting” our Miserable Lives

“Correcting” our Miserable Lives

I just finished The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen. I found my attention wandering the duration of the novel but somehow I kept on reading it until the end and rather enjoyed seeing what miserable thing was happening next to the characters.  I was interested in what happened to them but felt there was something missing in my connection to them.  I may have just disliked them.  I don’t know.  I did like them as well.  I did like the book but it just isn’t really my favorite style of literature.  Perhaps I should have taken a pencil to this book to alleviate some confusion but I just didn’t feel all that interested in digging very deep.

The ending was somewhat promising except for poor Alfred who at the end of his life just wanted death to take him.  I felt kind of bad that Enid, at 75 was just beginning her life of freedom and I would like to know if she was able to find happiness in her life.

Franzen’s imagination for situations his characters must endure is to be applauded.  As we traveled through each character’s life something new and unanticipated always happened.  Most of the time I was bewildered at what I was reading.  Not sure if I am totally in agreement with modern literati hailing this as one of the best novels of recent years.  But then again I am just not totally into modern literature nor am I qualified to review it.  Like in one of my recent posts I have decided to focus more on recent literature.

I can obviously tell the difference between The Corrections and the next book I started, The Lottery Winner by Mary Higgins Clark… The plot of the mystery stories are so laughable and simple.  I kind of like trying to figure out a  good whodunnit novel once in a while.  But more along the lines of Denis Lehane than M.H.C.   I only chose this one because I wanted an easy no-brainer after Franzen’s novel but all I had in the box of books I was unpacking were this one and a bunch of  hefty 18th and 19th century British novels that I knew I could never focus on at the moment.

So I guess the point of Franzen’s novel was that our lives are spent in the pursuit of happiness.  Wow…  I have never read a book with a theme like that before.  There never was a more American theme in modern literature than that one.  Well this was one of the better ones I suppose and told with 5 truly unique perspectives from a modern American family.  I wonder if he was trying to write T.G.A.N (The Great American Novel).  Will people ever stop pursuing this?  Doubt it.

 

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